International Service Projects
The Rotary Club of Welland invests in many international service projects that help to improve the quality of life for children, families and communities.
 
These are just a few of the recent International Service Projects the Welland Rotary Club is currently undertaking:
  1. Two projects investing in science equipment, kitchen equipment and technology at the Newton Science School in Candelaria, Philippines;
  2. Repair and renovation of a school for children with special educational requirements in Candelaria, Philippines;
  3. Educational Uplift Program for 23 elementary schools, 4 high schools and 1 special education school and 2 alternative learning schools; involved with about 50,000+ students.  This involved building a relationship with each school and working with the Department of Education to set up achievement criteria and to establish a teaching program for the teachers to enable them to work effectively with the equipment;
  4. Investment in developing a water well to supply water to three local villages, as well as training in the Philippines;
  5. Investment in Nicaragua in partnership with the local Rotary Club and the Providenco organization to supply 14 villages with a Nanny and a Billy Goat.
The Rotary Club of Welland is dedicated not only to supporting local initiatives but also in providing support and investment internationally.
 

Liberian Learning Centre 

Welland Rotary Club donated $1,000 toward the building of a library in Liberia near the capital Monrovia to establish the only library in this West African nation. It will serve 1,000 students that have no access to books and enable the teaching facility to develop minds more effectively. This will be housed in Liberian Learning Centre a structure that will cost more than $3 million to which a number of world organizations will contribute. Hamilton Rotarian Leo Johnson made a presentation to our Club on May 21, 2019. For more information, please use this link: https://empowermentsquared.org/liberian-learning-centre
 

Buenavista West Elementary School in the Candelaria Municipality, Luzon, Philippines 

 
The Rotary Club of Welland Rotary provided $18,000 towards a $44,000 inclusive of a Rotary District Grant for the construction of a 2-classroom simple school building with toilet and hand-washing block in each classroom. Lighting and ventilation fans are also included. It will take more or less 3 months to finish the construction. The grade levels are Grade 5 & 6. The reason for classroom shortage is due to increasing number of enrolling pupils. When it rains the teacher could hardly teach anymore because of the noise created by the rain on the roof because it has no ceiling and also the floor gets wet. When there are strong winds, they immediately suspend the classes because those makeshift partitions made of plywood could be blown away and could hurt the children. 
 
While construction is the main event in this project it will be complement by providing not only a new building alone, but pedagogical training  specifically focusing on improving learning outcomes and a hygiene and sanitation/menstrual hygiene program that will be taught by qualified teachers.
 
This project is just beginning to be constructed and will be completed before the end of June 2020 and before the rainy season begins in July.

 

Cambridge Bay Nunavut

A donation of $550 to Kullik Ilihakvik Elementary School to the teacher of  6th Grade students to purchase books written in the Inuit language Innuinnaqtun by Inuit authors about cultural stories. The students of which there are 236 in this school and some 10 in 6thgrade. The teacher stated that it is a very good means to keep calm in the class as the students engage in reading and in listening to other students reading the stories. There are only two communities that speak the local language, Cambridge Bay and Kugluktuk.
 
The community has three small restaurants, a community hall, a health centre, a post office and an arena. There is a hardware store and 2 grocery stores with 2 convenience stores to serve this community of 1,600 people mainly Inuit although there are many transient workers. Food prices are very high in this community and cheap foods are usually of the unhealthy variety.
 
The winter is most severe and dark all day and night with temperatures in November at -35 degrees with a wind chill factor and winds up to 50 miles per hour. They only close the schools when the wind gets to 70 miles per hour and visibility is only 2 meters.
 
Despite the weather people are friendly and kind and they really promote and follow the IQ principles of respect and cooperation which is really felt by an outsider.
 
The picture is of a double sun where the sun reflects 2 beams of light on each side. Plus, a map of the area and one of the harsh environment.
 
Douglas Johnson ( As related by a teacher who is responsible for the Grade 6 students’ education)
 
 
 
 
 
 
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